A Case for Independence

There is one idea that I have heard and read in most the information on this topic that sticks out and frustrates me: The law is having a hard time keeping up with the constant growth of the technology. The inability of the law to keep pace with the technology it governs poses a problem with instructing and abiding the law. How can we expect students to value and abide a law that they know will be reconsidered and revised within a year? If law is to effectively adapt to the technology it presides over, then a proper law-making body must be given the resources and autonomy to effectively create that law. The (Hudson Institute) White Paper makes the acceptable and fair case that the U.S. Copyright Office needs to be released from underneath the Library of Congress to ensure that intellectual property is managed properly and effectively. The success of the system’s past does not guarantee the system’s success in the future.

The Library of Congress may have spread its resources effectively to handle the U.S. Copyright Office in the past; however, the present and the future demand a change. I take one major idea away from this week: a large amount of assumptions are made concerning intellectual property and copyright law due to preconceptions of an outdated system. When addressing this issue from a growth mindset, it becomes difficult to side with staying in the same location. Adapting the U.S. Copyright Office practices within the constraints of the Library of Congress seems more like a sustaining innovation that is failing to effectively innovate. Allowing the U.S. Copyright Office to move out and begin practices with autonomy seems more like a disruptive innovation that holds immense potential to effectively create and implement law. Laws regarding plagiarism and copyright infringement along with the enforcement of said laws must be the sole purpose of the governing organization.

The U.S. Copyright Office must be able to provide the guidelines for understanding and enforcing copyright laws. Once those guidelines are in place, with a certain freedom to adapt, intellectual property can be created in an environment that values authorship which will result in increases in speed of information being transmitted and the validity of the information being transmitted. When the information being transmitted sees these increases, the development of societies with access to the Internet will exponentially rise creating a global community in which human rights can be acknowledged and granted to each of its citizens.

References:

The Hudson Institute. (2015). A 21st Century Copyright Office: The Conservative Case for

     Reform. Washington, D.C: Author.

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